Using Systems To LEVEL UP Your SALES MINDSET

Daniel Nicart is both a sales manager and sales trainer providing mortgage bankers with sales training and mindset development.

In this episode of The Salesman Podcast, Daniel shares the systems that we can put in place to make sure that our mindset is constantly improving rather than only working on it when we hit a roadblock.

You'll learn:

Sponsored by:

Featured on this episode:

Host - Will Barron
Founder of Salesman.org
Guest - Daniel Nicart
Sales Coaching and Mindset Mentoring Specialist

Resources:

Transcript

Will Barron:

Coming up on today's episode of The Salesman's Podcast.

 

Daniel Nicart:

Mindset plays an important role for the sales community, because sales in itself, it's an emotional sport. It's the ability to transfer and relay emotion. And because it's an emotional sport, I think a lot of salesmen overlook how important mindset is to their day-to-day function.

 

Will Barron:

Hello Sales Nation, I am Will Barron, host of the Salesman's Podcast, the world's most-listened to B2B sales show. If you haven't already, make sure to click subscribe. And with that, let's meet today's guest.

 

Daniel Nicart:

Hey everybody. My name is Daniel Nicart. I'm actually a producing sales manager, and I'm fortune enough to lead the number one team on a national sized multi-billion dollar lending institution company that deals all across the US. And I also am a huge sales enthusiast. I am passionate about sales, mindset development, negotiation techniques, and developing a new way of selling.

 

Will Barron:

On today's episode with Daniel we're diving into mindset, and not the usual conversation that you've had about mindsets in the past. We're diving into how we can systematically improve it, how we can put processes in place to improve our mindsets and raise our standards every single day. And so, with that said, let's jump right into the conversation.

 

Will Barron:

(silence)

 

When Changing or Improving Our Mindset, is This Something We Do Once or is This a Continuous Process? · [01:19]

 

Will Barron:

Should we be looking to improve, change our mindsets, upgrade what we believe that we can and can't do. Is it something that we do once? Or is this something that we do need to do over and over and over as, I guess, our careers develop?

 

“I think that mindset plays an important role for the sales community, because sales in itself, it's an emotional sport. It's the ability to transfer and relay emotion. And because it's an emotional sport, I think a lot of salesmen overlook how important mindset is to their day-to-day function.” – Daniel Nicart · [01:33] 

 

Daniel Nicart:

Yeah it's a great question. Well I think that mindset plays an important role for the sales community, because sales in itself, it's an emotional sport. It's the ability to transfer and relay emotion. And because it's an emotional sport, I think a lot of salesmen overlook how important mindset is to their day-to-day function. 

 

“Because sales is such a high contact sport, you're facing a lot of rejection, you're facing a lot of resistance, you continuously have to grow and adapt to current times, and the only real way to really push past and motivate yourself is through having the right mindset techniques in place. And so mindset is just, I would say, an ongoing topic for the everyday salesman that wants to reach the next level. Because without a strong mindset, you're simply just going to give up, you're going to remain stagnant, or you're never really going to reach your full potential.” – Daniel Nicart · [02:03]

 

Daniel Nicart:

Being in a sport like sales, I've noticed, or at least I've learned over the last 20 years, is that because it's such a high contact sport, you're facing a lot of rejection, you're facing a lot of resistance, you continuously have to grow and adapt to current times, and the only really way to really push past and motivate yourself is through having the right mindset techniques in place. And so mindset is just, I would say, an ongoing topic for the everyday salesman that wants to reach the next level, because without a strong mindset, you're simply just going to give up, you're going to remain stagnant, or you're never really going to reach your full potential.

 

Daniel Nicart:

And so at least in my opinion, personally, every single day I'm still a producing sales manager, and I run a team of about 15 sales representatives. And what I know is true is that those that I see with the strongest mindset pieces in place, or mindset practises in set, like morning rituals, exercising, meditation, self-development, audio books, reading books, I've noticed that they stand out from the rest. As opposed as compared to individuals who have this stagnant mindset. And stagnant mindset, what I'm talking about are just individuals who just accept things the way they are. They don't necessarily take the approach of being creative, stepping out of their comfort zone, and challenging the norm, where they look at a particular platform or foundation. Let's just say a sales floor or a sales process that is put in place from an organisation, or a business, and they accept it as it is.

 

Daniel Nicart:

Rather than think outside the box, they'll look at the problems as opposed to find solutions. Now, if you look at the crowd who has the mindset practises in place, and these are individuals that do everything from, have morning rituals, they wake up a couple hours early, they invest time every single day in watching great content like your channel, my channel, and they really invest in themselves, not only invest into training course, but they invest into content and mastermind groups and mentors and coaching. And what I've noticed from them is that they constantly challenge themselves. So they're always stepping outside of the comfort zone. They're willing to take the risks. They're willing to put themselves out there understanding that defeat, rejection, and resistance is actually a good thing.

 

Daniel Nicart:

Whereas the stagnant mindset typically looks at these things, the rejection, the hard work, the hours, the sacrifice, they look at is as: Well, I shouldn't have to do that. I belong with a strong organisation, we have a strong brand. You should give me the best leads, the lay down leads. And there's that misconception where, I think the newer age, or even sometimes veteran and seasoned sales people will be stuck in their ways. And today, in 2019, it just simply doesn't work anymore. You have to be versatile. You have to understand not only the end result that you're trying to deliver, your prospect, or the organisation that you're trying to fulfil an order, or create a relationship with.

 

Daniel Nicart:

But you have to really be more empathetic, whereas the days of Glengarry Glen Ross, Boiler Room, all those old sales movies, those tactics, the shark tactics, it's actually pushing more people away. So there's a good way to be aggressive and there's a bad way to be aggressive, but I think it all comes down to mindset development, and by putting a system in place, and creating the right actions right from when you wake up. I'm talking about the smallest detail from channelling yourself to not hit snooze, challenging yourself to get up, go out to the gym even though it's raining or even though it's cold. It's those little small wins that will help you develop a strong mindset by the time that you get into your place of business, or before you get into your origination or your prospecting calls. You'll be a little bit more prime and conditioned to win, because you've taken so much time and so many steps to improve the one thing that matters most, and that is your mindset.

 

The Difference Between a Skilled Salesperson Who Lacks the Right Mindset and an Unskilled Salesperson Who Boasts a Great Mindset · [06:10]  

 

Will Barron:

So let me pose this to you, because this will give some context for the audience. Clearly you've got a team underneath you. Say you're hiring a new individual and two people come in, they're equally qualified. One person has a strong mindset for right now. They're probably doing everything right, but they have no ritual or routine, or have minimum. And then another person is perhaps trying to work on themselves, they're trying to develop themselves, but they do have the habit and, you used the word this is in place to improve themselves. All else considered equal, which one would you most likely want to hire?

 

“What I've noticed is that, even though you can be good at something, if you don't have the right mindset, if you don't have the right influence or motivation, you're simply just going to do subpar production. So you're going to be okay with subpar results. You're going to be okay with being in the middle. Whereas I notice that, even if you're not as skilled, if you have the right mindset, you are always constantly pushing yourself to raise above the average.” – Daniel Nicart · [07:11] 

 

Daniel Nicart:

I think that, which is funny because I've seen this time and time again, I think there are some people who are just naturally gifted. They're very extroverted, and so there are some people that are just naturally good at sports. And I think the same thing applies with communication. There are people who are naturally good at communication. But what I've noticed is that, even though you can be good at something, if you don't have the right mindset, if you don't have the right influence or motivation, you're simply just going to do subpar production. So you're going to be okay with subpar results. You're going to be okay with being in the middle.

 

“Your mindset influences your actions. Because I think the window to your mindset is your eyes. And the reason for that is your view, your perception of certain things is what fuels your mindset. So if you see things as a challenge, you can operate in two ways. You can operate and say, “Okay, I see this as a challenge I'm going to figure out.” Or you can look at is as, “Oh, this is too difficult. I don't want to figure this out. Show me an easier path.” – Daniel Nicart · [07:45] 

 

Daniel Nicart:

Whereas I notice that, even if you're not as skilled, if you have the right mindset, you are always constantly pushing yourself to raise above the average. And so even if you are, let's say, a beginner, or you're going into an industry or selling a particular product that you've never sold before, one thing rings true is that your mindset influences your actions. Because I think the window to your mindset is your eyes, right? And the reason for that is your view, your perception of certain things, is what fuels your mindset. So if you see things as a challenge, you can operate in two ways.

 

Daniel Nicart:

You can operate and say, “Okay, I see this as a challenge I'm going to figure out.” Or you can look at is as, “Oh, this is too difficult. I don't want to figure this out. Show me an easier path.” And so to answer your question, if I had a choice between the two, I would actually go with the one who was less skilled but had the right mindset to learn, because typically those who are more skilled has the experience enough to where they're bringing in bad habits from their past experience. And if they're not willing to challenge their growth, or fuel their mind, then I think that they're just going to be stuck in their ways. You're not necessarily going to push them. They'll be very independent, which will be great for a leader because you want your team to be automated and self-efficient.

 

Daniel Nicart:

But what you're not going to find is someone who's going to push themself to get to that next level. Even though they're great at their job, they're still the one who just does just enough. Whereas even the smaller one, let's say the alternative option of the sales agent, who may not necessarily say the right words, but they're brave because their mindset fuels that hunger to put themself out there. So even though they're tripping, they're falling, they're scraping and bruising themselves, you see growth. And I know that at one point, they will eventually become better. And that person will actually become more successful than the more skilled person without the right mindset actions in place.

 

Daniel Explains Why Having a Chip on Your Shoulder Might Actually be a Good Thing · [09:35] 

 

Will Barron:

How healthy is it for… And I suffer from this. If it's healthy, I'll share my thoughts on it. If it's not healthy I'll attempt to stop doing it. But how healthy is it in sales business, whatever it is, to have a bit of a chip on our shoulder? So what I mean by that is: I am not particularly… Maybe I'm gifted at some things, but I'm not particularly gifted at sales. So I have to work hard at it, and I have to constantly try and almost reinvent my mindset, which we'll come onto in a second and reinvent myself, for the sale, for the deal size, for the environment. I have to do this. I don't just have the gift of the gab, I can't just walk into a room and build rapport with people quickly. So I've got a bit of a chip on my shoulder. Every time someone says something that's negative about me, I go, “I'm going to show you. I'm going to prove you wrong.” And that drives me.

 

Will Barron:

So I see it financially as a positive thing. But almost in the world we live in, you've got these two [inaudible 00:10:27] balls of some people who go, “Yup, drill down on that. That's really powerful.” And then you got another side of people who go, “Oh no, we should sit and meditate and sit on a rock in the desert for six months and not speak and get rid of all that. That's ego. We don't need ego.” Clearly the answer is probably somewhere in the middle. But is it healthy, and do people with a chip on their shoulder, end up having more success than individuals who just plod along without this?

 

Daniel Nicart:

Yeah, that's a great question. I think me personally, speaking from my experience and seeing it both ways, I've met a lot of successful sales representatives who don't necessarily have a chip on their shoulder. They just genuinely like helping people, and so they'll actually attract success to themselves and they won't even know it. They're just natural. And I, myself coming up, I favoured having that resistance and that doubt. So I operate well with a chip on my shoulder. I actually need it. I'm kind of addicted to it. And the reason for that is because I like when something is doubted upon me. So for example, I have a channel of YouTube and Facebook, and you have a channel of course.

 

Daniel Nicart:

So sometimes you'll see comments from the audience that will critique your work.

 

Will Barron:

I think you're being very polite there with that word.

 

Daniel Nicart:

Yeah. I mean, they'll go out of their way and they'll say some comments that are off the wall. And at the end of the day, you can look at it and fold and just say, “Okay fine, this just isn't for me.” But I look at it as a challenge, and I'll actually look at it for what it's worth, instead of look at it as, “Hey, they're talking about me,” because that individual simply does not know me. And so I think when we come up, especially in this day and age, we're always going to face this resistance. At some point we're always going to face doubt, not only from our colleagues but even sometimes from our family and from our closest friends. And the way that we operate I think is going to be based individually. It's going to be case by case per person. 

 

Daniel Nicart:

But in my opinion, I think having a chip on your shoulder is necessary because when you have a chip on your shoulder in a good way, because you can have a chip on your shoulder in a bad way and just be this real narcissist and just think that everyone's talking about you, everyone's against you. And it will come out in your tonality and your body language that you're on defence all the time. But if you know how to balance it, where you have a chip on your shoulder in a sense that you want to prove to everyone else, including yourself, that you are more than capable and more than worthy and more than entitled for the same fortunes and success as every other person, because every other person's just like you. THey're just a person. And if they could figure it out, and they could push themselves and reach levels and heights that you aspire to reach, you can too.

 

Daniel Nicart:

And so if you can balance it out where you use that chip on your shoulder as motivation, as fuel, as fire, then also balance yourself so that you're not necessarily coming out too aggressive to where you're being cocky, or you're being rude, or you're being offensive, and you find that fine line, then I think it could be very, very powerful. I think it's something that we, personally, will look at, for those who operate well with a chip on their shoulder. We look at it from a state of defence, but also a state of offence. So again, it's that fine balance.

 

Daniel Nicart:

So you have to be defensive for your dreams, your goals, your aspirations. I'm defensive for mine. For example, I do everything that I can and protect my family, my children, the experiences that they have in their life, the experiences that I have in my life, and I won't necessarily settle. But at the end of the day, I'm humble enough to know where I came from. And I'm very appreciative, so I'm not necessarily going out there like I'm entitled. I'm going out there like I deserve it and I'm going to get it.

 

Will Barron:

I like this offence versus defence, because the way I think about this, because this could be taken out of context perhaps. When I say I've got a chip on my shoulder, I don't know who said this but this sticks in my mind of, “I want to build the biggest building. I don't want to win by knocking everyone else's. I want to win by being the best, even if it's 1% better than the competition.” Clearly in sales it's a zero sum game most of the time, and so you're going to win from that side. So I'm not looking at ruining other people, especially in, I don't know, the podcast space. I could probably say some choice words about a few other people in this space, and it would affect them. I don't want to do that. I want to win by having the best podcast, the biggest audience, all that kind of stuff.

 

The Power of Feedback Loops and How to Use Them to Achieve Sales Success · [15:06] 

 

Will Barron:

So it goes on this offence and defence side of things, and this might be a better way of posing it, might be: Do we need feedback loops? So it doesn't necessarily mean that you've got a chip on your shoulder. It doesn't necessarily mean that you want to beat other people. But do we need to engineer feedback loops into our sales activities and our mindsets so that we say, “We've gotten to this point. Now we need to take it up a level, and up a level, and up a level, forever and onwards.” Are feedback loops perhaps a better way of describing the chip on the shoulder.

 

Daniel Nicart:

Oh yeah. Yeah. Now I understand. So I think having feedback loops, the resertiveness, where you're always looking how far you've come, but at the same time not letting that be the determination of whether or not you continue to keep going. So for example, and I think all salesmen will relate, is that any sales organisation has a sales floor and a sales team. Sales keep businesses afloat. They keep businesses alive. And so inside this sales organisation, you have this economy. It's this city within a business. And so if you really think about it, every successful sales company gives KPIs, the key performance indicators. And so they determine your success based on small actions that lead up the final result, and that result typically is a sale, it's a fostered relationship, it's a new account, whatever it may be.

 

“I think why sales is such a competitive sport is because it always reminds you that you're only as good as what you bring to the table today.” – Daniel Nicart · [16:41] 

 

Daniel Nicart:

And wherever you fall within this sales organisation, whether you're in the bottom 30%, you're at the mid mark, or you're in the top 10% of your sales organisation, you're constantly reminded of where you are. And I think that's why sales is such a competitive sport is because it always reminds you that you're only as good as what you bring to the table today. And so, with your question of having a chip on your shoulder, or having that fuel and motivation, I think what separates the successful versus the average are those that look at that chart, and wherever they are, they're actually studying the top.

 

Daniel Nicart:

And so they're studying the top because that's where they want to go. Whereas the alternative, the average sales agent, is more or less is trying to figure out how to just stay under the radar. So they're okay with being in the middle, as long as they don't necessarily go to the bottom half. And what I've found, or at least what I've learned as well as experienced myself, is that any organisation I've ever worked for, I've always studied the top 10, or the top echelon of that sales floor, because I wanted to watch them from afar. I wanted to soak up their actions, and their practises so that I knew exactly what it takes to become one of the top 10.

 

Daniel Nicart:

Whereas what I've noticed from my fellow colleagues and individuals that I work side by side with, they will look at that top 10, again with the chip on the shoulder, but in a bad way. So they'll look at them and say, “Oh they probably get the better leads because they're the manager's favourite.” Or, “They probably get the Glengarry leads because they've been here longer, or they're seasoned. And I just can't never get that because my manager doesn't like me.” And so they'll look for external excuses as to why they can't climb, and they'll fold even though they have the chip on the shoulder, that saying. It's in a bad way.

 

Daniel Nicart:

So they'll actually hold themselves down as opposed to use the saying of chip on the shoulder as a good metaphor to push themselves and figure out how to climb to that top 10 and join the rest.

 

Daniels Thoughts on Whether Mindset and Sales Success Ultimately Comes Down to the Standards You Set For Yourself · [18:37]

 

Will Barron:

How much of this, and I never even thought about this before, but hopefully makes some sense, to yourself Daniel and the audience. How much of this comes down to our standards? Because for context, I've always been the middle of the pack person. I've always been, “Well I want to do enough that I don't get sacked. I don't really care about, if I'm earning 100 grand a year in this medical device sales role, I'm having a nice little life. I'm 25, 26, earning that money, got me company BMW, got me awesome girlfriend and we're going out partying and whatever. I'm happy.” And that is the standard that I've set for myself, right?

 

Will Barron:

But I feel, as you're saying this, if for whatever reason, inadvertently or not, I ended up in the top 5% or 10%, then I'd be going, “Shit, I don't want to drop out of this, so I'm going to now compete with these guys and girls rather than competing with the people in the middle of the pack,” and essentially just stay in 5%, 6%, 10% over target, more so than the people on the other end who are getting cut every year. So how much of this comes down to the standards where we are set? And is this malleable, or is this hard-wired into our brains?

 

Daniel Nicart:

That's a great question, because it's so common to see a sales representative remain in an average role, or in that mid mark, they're under the radar, they're not necessarily at the bottom half, but they don't necessarily have the spotlight, so they may not be getting all the acknowledgement and the awards, but at the end of the day they do just enough to keep their seat. Because sales is that dog eat dog sport, right? So if you're not producing results, unfortunately you get let go and typically those sales agents will be going from company to company to company to company, and there's really no security left. And so I think that it is important to, of course, find happiness. So wherever you are, whether it's in the middle, the top, whatever makes you happy.

 

Is Being Happy or Comfortable with Your Current Status a Silly Excuse For not Wanting to Do and Be More? · [20:35]

 

Will Barron:

Is that an excuse though? Is that bullshit to be, “I'm happy here.” Or, is that an okay thing to say? If that makes sense.

 

Daniel Nicart:

Yeah, yeah. I believe it's okay just because that that's particular individual's way of thinking, that's their particular mindset. And I think that's where mindsets differ, where if they're settled, and they're okay, they're just getting by, then I think it's going to be up to that particular person to pus themselves and want more, right? Where some people are going to look at sales in different ways, I think it really comes down to two ways. It comes down to, one: I can make a tonne of money, or I can make more than if I worked some just 9-5 job, because there's bonuses, there's incentives, there's commissions schedules, right? 

 

Daniel Nicart:

Whereas other individuals will look at it and say, “Wow, I literally have no ceiling. I can make as much as I desire. All I have to do is really master this process.” And they'll look at financial freedom as more of the upside. Whereas, I guess being financially independent is a different thing, right? Like, “Okay, I'm paying my bills. I've got a nice car. I've got a nice girl. My life is good. I guess I'll just go ahead and coast.” As opposed to looking at it like a top producer, who's looking at it three, five, 10 years down the line and seeing the big picture. Whereas I think the average, kind of mediocre sales agent is just looking at it for the day. They make their goals for the month and they live on the month to month basis.

 

Will Barron:

Because I'm asking this personally. I'm getting coached here as well. So we're a few months away from relaunching our sales school platform. There's loads of cool stuff that comes within that. I've shown it to a, she wouldn't probably appreciate me calling her a mentor, but she's basically been and done a lot of what I'm doing, a teaching platform, but in a different vertical. And she's done very well for herself. Let's put it that way. Anyway, she was going, “Well this, this, and this. This is your marketing, your message is great. And you've got this and it's going to help all these people.” And she goes, “And what kind of revenue are you thinking that you're going to be able to generate a year, two years from now?”

 

Will Barron:

And I was very open and honest, and I give her a number, and she looked at me like I was an idiot. She looked at me like I was absolutely insane. And she goes, “Why is that number so low?” And it's five times more than I ever made in sales, perhaps even more than that pondering on it for a second. It's three times more than the company makes right now, which is still doing well for the little business that we are. And she was still like, “How are your standards so low?” When I'm thinking that I'm shooting above and beyond what we've ever done in the past. 

 

Will Barron:

And so then I was just like, “Well why is it so low?” And she couldn't quite put it in words. She couldn't quite explain to me other than just, “You'll see over time as you smash it.” Basically she said, “You're going to smash that goal within the first 12 months, and then you need to have a rethink about it all.” And clearly I'm not trying to humble brag here because it doesn't exist. It might not make any money. It might be a total flop. But it was really interesting to me to have someone look at me, just face to face, going, “Why are your standards so low,” when the revenue numbers that we're talking about here are, again, at the top end of my perception on things.

 

How Your Environment Influences Your Success · [24:00]

 

Will Barron:

So why is it that we have these numbers? And clearly it is malleable because I'm talking about it, and she broke down my thought process and programming with this. So where do these numbers come from? Perhaps is the place to start, and then we can look at how we can systematically break them down over time.

 

Daniel Nicart:

Yeah. That's a great question, and a real good way to segue into how important your environment and influences are. Because I think that if you have a specific energy around you, you're in essence limited. So without having the right mindset, technically your view is very limited, where it's not as expanded as those who are experienced and those who have enough experience to know the potential. And so they see the opportunity, and they grab it by the horns, and they take it as far as they can. Whereas as some entrepreneurs, or some content creators, or even just some salesmen for that matter, will look at it as, “Okay, well if I just do A, B, and C, then I should be able to get D, E, and F.” It's very logical. It's very systematic.

 

Daniel Nicart:

Where I've seen, at least in my personal opinion, that if you just go all-out and you put yourself out there, and you have fun, you begin to love the process. And it's very important that those who you surround yourself with are also somewhat on that same wave length, because if you are surrounded by Debbie Downers, or mediocrity, then you're naturally going to adapt. It's human instinct to just adapt to our surroundings. And that plays a huge influence with our mindset. So let's say if we grew up in the middle class, we're not going to necessarily think that we're entitled to also live wealthy, in a wealthier class.

 

Daniel Nicart:

Where what's odd is if you grew up in the lower class, and maybe you came from a background of poverty, you emotionally feel the pain of being limited, and being restrained from having that sense of freedom. And so you initially desire to not feel that way. And the only reference that you have are those who don't feel that way, which are those who are typically wealthy. And so I think that's probably why most who come up in a middle class lifestyle remain middle class, is because that's all they know. Whereas if you come up in poverty, what's ironic is that you don't necessarily know the wealthy lifestyle, but you constantly think about it all day and every day. And because you're focused on that wealthy group, you see what they do, and you're studying them from afar. You may not be knowing it, but you see the limitless amount of prosperity that they can really experience, and you ask yourself, “Well why can't I do that too?”

 

Daniel Nicart:

But if you ask the middle class, “Hey don't you want to live like the wealthy?” They may not necessarily be encouraged and say, “Yeah, blah, blah, blah.” Because they never have really felt the pain of poverty, so they're okay. They're getting by, and just as long as the bills are paid and the lights are on, it's okay because that's all they know. So I hope that answers your question.

 

Will Barron:

Yeah, we've never touched on this in the show in the past, and I think this is really interesting. So it's essentially, not all of it, but there's a whole chunk of hip hop culture which is based around this, right? And then there's the alternate, and clearly I'm not from the world of hip hop. I'm in the middle class or lower, working class is what we call it in the UK, low to middle working class, of comfortable. On Maslow's Hierarchy of Needs, most of them are met, right? There's a roof over me, a loving family, food on the table, all that kind of stuff. And interestingly, as you were going through this I was like, “Well, what would someone who is in the…” Not 1%. I know that's achievable for most people. That's $300,000 a year or whatever it is.

 

Will Barron:

If you're in the million, two million in revenue or in commission, which I know a bunch of sales people listening to the show are in that realm, which is incredibly exciting for everyone else who's listening who's aspiring to be there. There's people listening right now alongside you, who are your peers, who are there. Well they're in the realm of going, “I'm going to get a new boat.” Well when they talk about boats with me, I immediately go, “That sounds like a bit of a pain in the ass. You've got to maintain it, you've got to pay for this.”

 

How to Systematically Improve Your Mindset · [28:44]

 

Will Barron:

And so my mindset immediately is: Cost of things, versus their mindsets because they're in so much revenues, commissions, bonuses, whatever you want to frame it up as, it's a negligible cost. It's the same as me buying the new iPhone, right? It's all in proportion. So with all that said Daniel, and we'll try and tie everything together with this: How do we systematically improve our mindsets? What principals do we need to know? What daily routines do we have to put in place so that, and I know you used this word before, there's a process in place for all of this so that it happens, and all we got to do is put one foot in front of the other each day, as opposed to have some kind of divine inspiration, or some beam of life that comes down and hits us on the head and turns some of this on?

 

Daniel Nicart:

Sure. Yeah, you know what? That's a great question. So I think first off, self-awareness is key. It's very, very relevant. You need to know exactly where you want to go. And whether it's at a point of survival, contentment, happiness, or if you wanted to be filthy rich to where you can have the option to go and buy a boat if you want. I think that you hit on a good meaning, because what we've noticed from that hip hop world, or even athletic world, is those that come from poverty, once they reach wealth, they spend it faster than they can earn it and they end up burning the bridges, or they at least burn the boats, and they find themselves in this point of no return.

 

“If you have enough self-awareness, and you have good intent behind you, and you know that your primary goal is to set up a secure foundation for yourself, and for those around you, I think that you will have better intentions when you're climbing to reach the levels that you're aspiring to reach.” – Daniel Nicart · [30:06] 

 

Daniel Nicart:

And so if they get injured, or if they don't sell enough records, they can't afford that lifestyle and then they disappear. And so I think that's a pretty dangerous habit to have, if you're living beyond your means. However, if you have enough self-awareness, and you have good intent behind you, and you know that your primary goal is to set up a secure foundation for yourself, and for those around you, I think that you will have better intentions when you're climbing to reach the levels that you're aspiring to reach.

 

“I think that the good practise is: Number one, is really understand why you do what you do, because that in itself is going to help you when temptation tries to push you away.” – Daniel Nicart · [30:26] 

 

Daniel Nicart:

And so, I think that the good practise is: Number one, is really understand why you do what you do, because that in itself is going to help you when temptation tries to push you away. So, temptation of, “Oh, I'll just get to it later.” Or, “I'll hit it next month,” or, “Maybe this wasn't my year.” And there's that voice of temptation that tells you, “It's okay, at least you tried.” As opposed to digging deep and remembering your true reason why.

 

“I think that if you can really hone in on why you do what you do, and really nail down the emotional factor behind it, you'll naturally develop the right mindset in the proper way.” – Daniel Nicart · [31:15] 

 

Daniel Nicart:

So if you peel back the layers of your why, it's more beyond the boat. It goes beyond the idea of having the fanciest car. What you're trying to find is love. You're trying to find acceptance. You're trying to find this sense of success. You are independent. And I think that if you can really hone in on why you do what you do, and really nail down the emotional factor behind it, you'll naturally develop the right mindset in the proper way. Where I think there are athletes, and there are musicians out there, who don't necessarily have the right mindset, but they're naturally talented. They can play an instrument, or they can play a sport very well. And so they're naturally going to make money, but without the mindset, habits, and techniques, they're going to burn through that money and they're going to fizzle out.

 

Daniel Nicart:

But if you look at players like Kobe Bryant, or stars like, let's say Lady Gaga. And I'm saying that just because I saw the movie A Star Was Born the other day. You look at these particular influencers, they're just like us, and they're passionate about their job, they're passionate about their art because they love the process. So beyond money, even though they're in a position where they can buy anything and everything, they're still doing good by providing value to their audience.

 

Daniel Nicart:

And so I think to answer your question, when it comes down to the practises and the techniques that one must have, I think that self-development is crucial. You have to be very disciplined to consistently work on improving yourself, and that all really starts, in my opinion, with a morning routine. The reason why a morning routine is more favourable, in my opinion, is because that's the way you start your day. And so, for example, most sales agents will wake up and be in the office ready to work within about a 30 to 45-minute window. Whereas if you had a morning ritual, you're typically up at 4:00 in the morning, 4:30, but you don't necessarily need to be in your place of business until 8:30 or 9:00. 

 

“And here's one thing that's very important to understand, your morning ritual has nothing to do with work. So you don't wake up and put out fires. That's not part of a morning ritual. You don't wake up and answer every single email in your inbox, or check social media, compare yourself to others. You really dedicate that morning ritual to fine-tuning yourself, feeding your mind, feeding your body, feeding your brain.” – Daniel Nicart · [33:17] 

 

Daniel Nicart:

But that first couple hours is designated to yourself. I live in a house filled with kids. I'm married and I have a family. So that first few hours is serenity to me, because it's all silent. It's dedicated to just me. I don't have noises. I don't have questions. And here's one thing that's very important to understand, is that your morning ritual has nothing to do with work. So you don't wake up and put out fires. That's not part of a morning ritual. You don't wake up and answer every single email in your inbox, or check social media, compare yourself to others. You really dedicate that morning ritual to fine-tuning yourself, feeding your mind, feeding your body, feeding your brain.

 

“I found that if you want up and check into work, all within an hour of time, you never really give yourself any time to work on you. And so if you constantly live or operate within that cycle where you don't necessarily feed yourself, you're not putting any work or investing into yourself, you're just going to be part of this process that is going to deflate your mindset. It's going to ruin the way you see things.” – Daniel Nicart · [34:12] 

 

Daniel Nicart:

And I think that whether you choose to do it through exercise, you choose to do it through reading, mediation, whatever you do, it's just about you. And it's really a point of reflection. So you're thinking about not only how far you've come, but what needs to be done to take yourself to the next level where you aspire to reach, because it's human nature to want to grow. It's human nature to want to problem solve. And I found that if you want up and check into work, all within an hour of time, you never really give yourself any time to work on you. And so if you constantly live or operate within that cycle where you don't necessarily feed yourself, you're not putting any work or investing into yourself, you're just going to be part of this process that is going to deflate your mindset. It's going to ruin the way you see things. Like I said, your eyes, the way you see things, are a window to your mindset. It's because of your perception of certain things.

 

Daniel Nicart:

And when you have a couple hours to dedicate to yourself, you start to see things different because you use these couple hours to work on yourself, to read, to study your art, and to watch influential channels, right? Like the Salesman Podcast, or Sales Remastered. And you challenge yourself to look at things in a different way and a different perspective, which thus develops the right mindset techniques because you're simply always constantly thinking outside the box, and you're not necessarily just focused on the fires, or the drama, or the problems, of the day ahead.

 

Effective Step Towards Creating the Perfect Morning Routine · [35:10]

 

Will Barron:

And this seems like a ridiculous question, but it's something that I'm very conscious of, because I struggle with this sometimes as well: How do you systemize that so that you're forced to do it every single day, especially with the why element of this? Because I am seemingly pretty stupid in that I have a why one day, and the next day I've forgotten about it. And then I go, “Oh, this is why I was doing all of it” a week later when I'm reminded from a conversation, or whatever it is. And I don't have a structure to put in place that allows me to go, “Every day I do this. This is why I'm doing it.” And I write in a journal, which really helps me, but I don't use affirmations or anything like that. Is there anything you recommend, Daniel, to make this, if it's part of our morning routine, that we know our why, that we know what we're doing, that we have a structure with our learning and development so that it seamlessly happens? So it becomes a habit, essentially.

 

Daniel Nicart:

Sure. Yeah. A great way to systemize your process of developing the right mindset and working towards success is you start with the end goal in mind, and then you reverse engineer it. So whether you want to be part of the 1% and earn $300,000 plus, you really have to identify and be very, very clear on what it is that you want and where you want to go, and then you reverse engineer it. So where most salesmen, I think a lot of salesmen watching this, are really going to relate with is when we set our goals. We set our goals typically on the month-to-month basis. We live our lives through the months goal. So this month I'm going to do X amount of sales. Or this quarter I'm going to do X amount of sales.

 

Daniel Nicart:

But not too many sales representatives actually breaks it down to a science or a systematic process. And so they'll say, “I'm aiming for 10 sales,” for example, “For this month.” And then once it gets about a third of the way through the month, they'll reassess their end goal, or the end result, because there was no process in place.

 

“In order to systemize the process of reaching your full potential, you have to know exactly where you're going and work backwards from there, and then every single day reinsert that goal. You understand the daily actions that are necessary in order to reach X. And that X is your deeper reason why. That has to be heavily influenced by your deeper meaning, your deeper intent.” – Daniel Nicart · [36:56] 

 

Daniel Nicart:

And so in order to systemize the process of reaching your full potential, you have to know exactly where you're going and work backwards from there, and then every single day reinsert that goal. You understand the daily actions that are necessary in order to reach X. And that X is your deeper reason why. That has to be heavily influenced by your deeper meaning, your deeper intent. So like I said, the example that we used for the person who wants to buy a boat. Well, he doesn't necessarily want to buy the boat. He wants to buy the freedom, the sense of not only confidence and entitlement that comes with owning a boat, but it's also the bragging rights, right? So he just wants to be accepted. That's his deeper layer why.

 

Daniel Nicart:

And so if he knows that in order to be accepted he needs to make $300,000-plus per year, he's really going to be motivated to make that $300,000 plus per year. Whereas if someone just wants to get a new car, they're limited because once they get that new car, then what? Right? So I think that in order to create an efficient system, it comes down to starting with the end goal in mind, and then working backwards, and then breaking it down to a daily regiment, a daily schedule. So it does require discipline because there's going to be times where you don't want to follow that schedule because it's going to be foreign to the things that you do every single day. You're always going to have an alternative, an alternative to do, or an alternative not to do. And that alternative not to do, it's always going to be there, right? Like, “Oh, I can get to it tomorrow.” That procrastination voice.

 

Daniel Nicart:

And so if you don't have a deep understanding of what your real intent is, and understand what your why is, and you don't have an understanding of the pieces and the actions that need to be taken every single day, not just for the entire month. I'm talking about every single day, to where you do those actions every day, and you go into the next understanding that you're not bringing in any of the baggage, nor the wins, into the next day, you're going to be just fine. Because if you go into the next day, and you had a successful day prior, you may ease off the throttle.

 

Daniel Nicart:

So you want to be very cautious about that and remember that every single morning, it starts from zero. Every single morning is a new opportunity. Every single morning is a new start. It's not living in the past, or celebrating the past wins, or sorrowing in the past drama. It's all about building and taking another step to move forward. So that's how you create a systematic process. You understand your why, you reverse engineer and understand the everyday actions that are needed to get yourself to that end result, and practise it every single day. And I think the morning ritual is just going to reinforce it so you give yourself that chance to enjoy the process, because really the winning is in the process. So your habits are what bring you to that right mindset, or that 1%, whatever that point of success is to that individual.

 

Will Barron:

I love it. I feel like this is the title for a book, Start From Zero. Because you've just outlined the problem that I have of, I'll have 14 days crushing it doing whatever I'm doing, whether it's content or it's selling advertising on the podcast, or selling the Sales School, B2B like we're doing now, and I 14 days in I go, “Well I've hit my revenue targets. I'll just coast for the next two or three days.” And I'm the one setting my own frigging targets. I run the business. I don't have a sales manager over my shoulder going, “No Will, just keep going.” So, I don't know if that's better or worse for me. It's probably worse for my personality. I probably need someone shouting down the phone at me to get my finger out and push forward with things.

 

Will Barron:

But that's exactly how I let myself down, perhaps. The mindset of starting from zero erases that immediately, and it sets up the day for, “Today's the battle. The war will do what it's going to do. The marketplace is going to shift. The environments' going to shift.” I don't have kids, and so I've got a quiet place to work at the moment, and so I should probably be doubling down on everything before kids and dogs and all that kind of stuff and adds another level of complexity to things. So I should be grateful for that at the moment.

 

Condition a Better You: Why You Need to Start Valuing Your Time · [41:02] 

 

Will Barron:

But yeah you can't necessarily control all of that, but you can control the day right? You can control, “I have a morning routine. I have a shower, I sit down,” and I guess that's the best way to leverage the start of things.

 

Daniel Nicart:

I think it's really about valuing your time, too. Because at the end of the day, whether it's a month or a quarter or a year from now, we're going to get there. And we're going to look back at our past actions, and we're going to be either in a point of regret or we're going to be in a point of celebration. And no matter what you're headed there. Time's not going to stop for you. And if you value your time, and you really hold yourself accountable, when you reach that quarter or when you reach the end of that year, and you look back, if you genuinely want to be in a place where you're not going to regret lost time, or regret a defeat, then you'd have to start every single day.

 

Daniel Nicart:

My team, we operate on a two-point system per day. So every single day we're aimed and designed to score at least two points, which all throughout the day I show them a scoreboard. And I'm on the scoreboard too because I'm a producing manager as well. And so I put myself out there as well, and that's enabled me to be on their level as opposed to be their superior. And that builds this camaraderie that I think is very important. But the idea and the philosophy behind it is that every single day that scoreboard wipes down to zero. So whether you scored three points or four points the day before, that doesn't matter anymore. Right now, you're at zero. And the goal is to get at least two points on the board before you go home. And when you come back tomorrow, again that board is going to be at zero.

 

“If you want to be a better person, if you want to be a better salesman, a better entrepreneur, a better teacher, whatever it is, you really have to start with understanding your deeper layers of your why, and what your intent is.” – Daniel Nicart · [43:00] 

 

Daniel Nicart:

So it's just this constant, constant cycle. And what has it done? It's made our team the number one team in the entire company. We've got over 100 sales teams. There's over 300 employees throughout the nationwide organisation doing business in the billions. And it's that simple philosophy that starts from the front line that can ripple throughout the entire organisation and influence all those around you. So if you want to be a better person, if you want to be a better salesman, a better entrepreneur, a better teacher, whatever it is, you really have to start with understanding your deeper layers of your why, and what your intent is.

 

Daniel’s Advise to His Younger Self on How to Become Better at Selling · [43:18]

 

Will Barron:

Love it. Well, with that, Daniel I've got one final question I ask everyone that comes on the show. You've answered it in the past. I'm going to ask you again, and that is: If you go back in time and speak to your younger self, what would be the one piece of advice you'd give him to help him become better at selling?

 

Daniel Nicart:

Wow. Good question. So if I can look back in time over 20 years ago when I first started sales and give myself one piece of advice, I would say, “Don't take everything so personally. Put yourself out there and don't be afraid to mess up.” Because if you're afraid to mess up, you're simply not going to grow. You're going to live your life and write your life with someone else's pen, and that's because you're too focused on other people's opinions and their views on you. And if you live in that way, you're not living for yourself, you're not living for your success, you're living for the acceptance by others. Accept yourself. Don't be afraid to fail, because the faster you fail, the faster you'll win. And when you do reach failure, make sure you look at it as stepping stones to success, because you'll only get better through failure.

 

Parting Thoughts: Daniel’s Sales Remastered · [42:20]

 

Will Barron:

Powerful stuff. Well with that, Daniel tell us about Sales Remastered, the YouTube channel, all the content, and then the training side of things as well.

 

Daniel Nicart:

Yeah definitely. I'd love to. So every Thursday from 8:30 AM to 9:00 Pacific Standard Time, I do a livestream at Sales Remastered, which is the name of the channel, on Facebook, YouTube, Instagram, and Twitter, and I share 30 minutes live with the sales community that follow my channel, and talking about mindset development techniques, negotiation techniques, marketing, solicitations, inbound, outbound business, consumer sales. And the courses that I have at Sales Remastered, there's this one product that I have, it's this programme. It's a six-week training programme that teaches you everything from marketing, process creation, mindset development, negotiation, as well as delivered direct mentoring where the students who are already enrolled get to share an hour with me every other week, much like we are where it's just us, and we focus on the problems that they're facing.

 

Daniel Nicart:

A lot of these problems are very common, and so what I found being useful is, inside this training course, I've provided a module. It's called the Mentor's Library, where I actually upload those mentoring sessions where a student can watch other mentoring sessions of other individuals who are facing the same challenges in case they didn't bring it up in our direct mentoring. But that's a programme that's doing extremely well with all the students that have already registered. They use that programme to climb to the top 10% of their organisation.

 

Daniel Nicart:

So not only has the investment paid for itself, but it's enabled them to experience the finer things in life that they were working so hard to get, but unfortunately they just simply didn't have the resources around them. They were kind of like maybe us, if you can relate, when we started in sales, we were just given a phone book and fed to the wolves, right? No formal training. No real excellent script. And so what's unique about my course or my training content online is that it's coming from an actual salesman. I'm in the trenches with you today. I'm not telling you something that used to work when I was young. I'm telling you something that I'm using today to make my wins and make my sales today.

 

Will Barron:

Good stuff. I appreciate that, coming from the same perspective of still trying me best to sell whilst on the podcast. We have different problems of, there's just too much inbound requests for the ad space, which is why we're developing our own product so I can be on the phone. And yeah, I look forward to continuing these conversations as a sales person to sales person, because it does make a difference. And hopefully the audience of Sales Nation appreciates that as well. And with that Daniel, I'll link to everything that we talked about in the show notes for this episode over at salesman.org. And with that, I want to thank you again for joining us on the Salesman Podcast.

 

Daniel Nicart:

Thank you so much Will. It was great being on the show.

 

Daniel Nicart:

(silence)

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