How To CRUSH ANY Selling OBJECTION With Jarrod Glandt

Jarrod Glandt is the Vice President of Sales at Cardone Enterprises and the Co-Host of the Young Hustlers Podcast. In today’s episode of The Salesman Podcast, Jarrod is explaining the step-by-step process to breaking through objections when on a sales call.

You'll learn:

Sponsored by:

Featured on this episode:

Host - Will Barron
Founder of Salesman.org
Guest - Jarrod Glandt
President at Cardone Enterprises

Resources:

Transcript

Will Barron:

Do you want to learn how to deal with any objection that could be possibly thrown at you in sales? Then this episode is for you. Hello, sales nation, and welcome to today’s episode of the Salesman Podcast. On today’s show, we have Jarrod Glandt. He is a true sales expert. He’s a true sales practitioner as well. He’d literally lead a team of salespeople who are doing what we’re talking about today, which is both cold calling and dealing with objections. You can find out more about Jarrod and what he’s doing over at cardoneuniversity.com. Everything else that we talk about has a link to in the show note to this episode of it, salesmanpodcast.com. Having all that said, let’s jump straight in. Jarrod, welcome to the Salesman podcast.

 

Jarrod Glandt:

It’s good to be here. Thanks for having me.

 

Percentage of Salespeople Who are Good at Handling Objections · [01:01] 

 

Will Barron:

You’re welcome, sir. I’m glad to have you on. We’re going to talk about handling objections today, but just to frame up the conversation before we get to all the juicy kind of tactical side of things, and you might have some data or it might be anecdotal, but what percentage might be too accurate? But what percentage of sales people that you deal with interact with and help train are good handling objections versus just completely suck at it?

 

Jarrod Glandt:

Yeah, I think that it depends on the stage of the deal that you’re talking about. If you’re talking about at the very beginning of the deal, if you’re making a B2B cold call, I think that probably 90% of sales people suck at it. If you’re talking about further along into the process, when you’re actually maybe negotiating a deal, you’re kind of getting towards the end of the deal, I think that actually improves because people are more settled into the call. So, it probably goes from 90% suck at it on the cold call, all the way up to maybe 50% are good at it when it actually comes time to close the deal up.

 

The Primary Principles for Handling Sales Objections · [01:50]

 

Will Barron:

So you’ve teed this up perfectly. You’ve top the next question, essentially, out my mouth here, Jarrod, of, how much of this is tactically, I know when someone says X, I say Y, versus how much of it is down to things like confidence is down to experience and gut feeling and knowing how to react to these things?

 

Jarrod Glandt:

Well, again, we make cold calls out of our office every day. We sell a platform called Cardone University. It’s a sales training programme that we sell the companies that have sales teams so that they can increase their production. Right? We are calling cold in most cases, business owners, executives, big companies, small companies, long sales cycles, short sales cycles. We’re calling everybody in and we spend the majority of our time with our team role playing of all skill levels, experience team, rookie sales team. We spend the majority of our time role playing the objections that you get in the first bit of the call. So, in the very beginning of the call. The reason I think that that’s so important is because a lot of things are coming together in a very short period of time.

 

“I would rather have a sales person that could get in the door and create an opportunity in the first place, than somebody who sucks on the front side of it but is average at the end.” – Jarrod Glandt · [03:37] 

 

Jarrod Glandt:

So when you say, is it about confidence? 100%. Is it about training? 100%. Is it about the amount of repetition that you’ve had actually going through and role playing and drilling? 100%. It becomes more of a refined skill and an instinct at the beginning of the call, whereas kind of towards the end of the call, it can be telegraphed. You’re comfortable, you’re in most cases, 30 minutes into a conversation. So, the stakes are much, much lower. So, I think I would rather have a sales person that could get in the door on the front end and create an opportunity in the first place, than somebody who sucks on the front side of it, but is average at the end. Does that make sense?

 

The Essence of Role Playing When Teaching Salespeople How to Handle Sales Objections · [04:00] 

 

Will Barron:

That makes total sense. And I think you just alluded to it here, but is role playing the best way to deal with this? Because this is something that most people hate doing, especially if it’s with a manager versus it’s a training partner or it is framed differently. But I know I used to hate looking like a dick head in front of my manager and him just grilling the heck out on me. Is that the best way to go about this? Is that the kind of like biggest leverage point that we’ve got?

 

Jarrod Glandt:

It’s not the best way. It’s the only way. It’s the only way you’re going to get good at handling objections like role play and drilling is hands down. It’s like, I use this analogy a lot. Like if you look at the best footballer or the best hockey player or basketball player, or if you look at the best golfer, if you look at the top athletes, the people making all the money, like the big money, you’re like, “Man, I want to be like that. I want to be like LeBron. I want to get LeBron paychecks.” You know how much work LeBron puts in before he even gets on the court? Like, I read this article about Michael Jordan. He said here, “I trained so hard that the games were easy. Like the game was the easy part for me. Training was the hard part.”

 

“I rarely come across sales organisations that effectively role play and train their salespeople, and it’s because sales people don’t like doing it. And believe me, if everybody doesn’t like doing something, there’s money to be made there. If it’s something that everybody’s pushing away from, there’s a massive opportunity in there waiting to be capitalised on.” – Jarrod Glandt · [05:24] 

 

Jarrod Glandt:

And so in business like I’ve got no shot at being LeBron James or Jordan Spieth or Rory Mcllroy or whoever. I have no chance at being that level of a professional athlete. I can make a shit load of money as a salesperson. So if I want to be paid like a professional salesperson, then my training needs to reflect that. And I rarely come across sales organisations that effectively role play and train and it’s because sales people don’t like doing it. And believe me, if everybody doesn’t like doing something there’s money to be made there. If it’s something that everybody’s pushing away from, there’s a massive opportunity in there waiting to be capitalised on. And so role play is a mandatory part of our daily training activity in our office. It gets the word. It’s about the repetition.

 

Jarrod Glandt:

A handful of people have written about the 10,000 hour rule. You do something for 10,000 hours, you master it. In my mind when you become a master, that’s when you make money as a salesperson, you become a master salesperson. Most people don’t practise 10 hours in a year in role play. They do it maybe once a month for 30 minutes with their manager at their review, or once a court. It’s just not something that’s a part. So I think it’s a mindset switch. And today you got to be better than ever. Like you don’t have the luxury that you did in years past. Right now, the consumer is much more educated. Now, the resources that they have available to them are far more expansive and far greater. The amateur salesperson is becoming less valuable.

 

“The amateur salesperson is becoming less valuable. The salesperson that cannot produce, that cannot cold call, that cannot fill a pipeline, that cannot close deals, that cannot follow up, the amateur salesperson that cannot do those things is becoming obsolete. And they will go away. The only people that will be left remaining in the digital age where larger and larger transactions are taking place without a salesperson involved is the pro. As the pie gets smaller, who gets fed? The hungriest, the fastest, the most skilled.” – Jarrod Glandt · [06:42] 

 

Jarrod Glandt:

The salesperson that cannot produce, that cannot cold call, that cannot fill a pipeline, that cannot cold, that cannot close deals, that cannot follow up, the amateur sales person that cannot do those things is becoming obsolete. And they will go away. The only people that will be left remaining in digital age where larger and larger transactions are taking place without a salesperson involved, the whole deal’s changing. The only person left the end of the game is the pro. As the pie get smaller, who gets fed? The hungriest, the fastest, the most skilled. So role playing isn’t the best way, it’s the only way if you want to make big money,

 

Role Playing as an Effective Sales Training Tool · [07:41] 

 

Will Barron:

And we’ll dive into strategy and some mindset stuff in a second. But how does this look day to day? Even for your team, is this something that we time block off from 9:00 till 10:00 and every morning, we rock and roll through this before we pick up the phone, as in almost a warm up for the real game? Is that how we should be doing this?

 

Jarrod Glandt:

Yeah, so basically what we do is our office day, our office hours are 9:00 to 6:00, right? That’s like our office hours. So, at 8:30, all the sales people show up for the morning sales meeting. Prior to 8:30, they are all required to have viewed six segments of training, six lessons of training from Cardone University or one of… We work for a sales trainer, right? So all of the trainings we do comes from Grant. So they’re going through books, closing programmes, prospecting programmes, follow up programmes, sales process, fact finding programmes. They’re consuming our own content, but they’re doing that prior. They’re completing a mandated training prior to showing up at 8:30 AM. From 8:30 AM until like 8:40, we do a quick meeting and discuss the training. From 8:40 to nine o’clock. We break off and we do role play. So it is like the warm up shots before you go into the game. Again, go back to a professional athlete. If you want to be a professional salesperson, athletes are a great reference point.

 

The Benefits of Role Playing and How to Practice It with Prospects and Existing Customers · [09:05] 

 

Will Barron:

It makes sense to me, and this is how I reframed this when I was in medical device sales, the way it was put to me was, in the opportunities where you’ve got to make money, why would you be making your mistakes? That should be where your A game is. And that’s when I changed my framing of this, and I never had to cold call. And I don’t know if I could. I don’t know if I could sit in an office and do it all day.

 

Will Barron:

The medical device role I had was going out into the field, speaking with surgeons. Because the products I sold being kind of welcomed in with open arms, but it’d still be the same thing. I would still practise role play kind of later on when I realised the benefits of all this. But I’d do that before I got to them and I wouldn’t be wasting my time, their time and the business’ revenue because I’m not playing the game the way it should be done, because I’m screwing up when I’m in front of the customers. It just seems like a no brainer, right?

 

Jarrod Glandt:

Yeah, we just call that practising on customers. So when we talk to clients and we’re presenting our programme to them, we ask them about their current training processes. We ask them about role play. And the majority of the time they say that the role play is not taking place. And if it does, it’s a half-ass thing that they do begrudgingly because they’re forced into doing it. And I could go into a whole tangent about leadership and what kind of the role that leadership has in creating that environment in that culture. But you have to make the time to do it. It’s the only way. And some people are in a sales environment or they’re in an industry or a product where that is not as important.

 

Jarrod Glandt:

Like if I work in advertising sales and I’m working a set territory and I’ve got set clients who are, I’m basically just showing up and taking an order for, Hey, what do you… I would say that role playing and drilling becomes a little less important, but you have to understand that those roles are going to be capped. Like the people that want to make big money, like the well-rounded sales people, there are plenty of sales people who are good sales people that would be horrible at cold calling. But the most, when you can get around like, I want that target as a customer. I want to go after that whale, and you can pick up the phone and you can see the deal from beginning to end. It’s the most empowering. It’s the most financially rewarding and it’s the biggest, it calls you what you are. It gives you the power to be a true salesperson who can create opportunities out of nothing.

 

“90% of sales people are dependent on the company that they work for, for leads, opportunities, brand, name, recognition, for everything. There’s a small percentage that operate independent of the company and they are typically the top producers. They are the ones that companies throw money at to try to keep them with the company. They are the elite.” – Jarrod Glandt · [12:14] 

 

Jarrod Glandt:

And that to a sales organisation is the most valuable person, because you’re not reliant on marketing dollars. You’re not relying on work and expense and energy and effort that the company puts in. Like we try to tell people, sales people is, 90% of sales people are dependent on the company that they work for, for leads, for opportunities, for brand, for name, for recognition, for everything. Okay. There’s a small percentage that operate independent of the company. They are the top producers. They are the outliers. They are the ones who create their financial path. They are the ones that companies throw money at to try to keep them with the company.

 

“The salespeople that don’t want to make big money, that want to stay in the middle, that want to stay under the radar, most of the time, are the people that are saying, “Hey, role play is just not my thing.” – Jarrod Glandt · [13:27] 

 

Jarrod Glandt:

They are the elite. They’re the ones when they walk in the office, everybody’s like, “There goes, Jarrod. He is a killer.” Right? Because they write their own check and they can write their own rule book. I got a guy here, his name’s Mike Bonnet. He’s written probably $3 million this year. We’re in August, right? He’s already hit his annual quota in August. He’s a monster, right? He’s a complete. When people walk in, we go, “There goes Mike Bonnet.” Right? And he’s probably the best person on a cold call that I’ve ever met in my life. And he gets handsomely paid for that. There’s a good chance he’ll make eight or 900 grand this year. So again, if you don’t want to make money, if you don’t want to make big money, if you want to stay in the middle, if you want to stay kind of under the radar, most of the time, those are the people that are saying, “Hey, the role play is just not my thing.”

 

Is Cold Calling a Skill We Should Be Trying to Master in 2017 · [13:40] 

 

Will Barron:

I want to ask you something here, Jarrod, and you’ve teed up and I wasn’t planning on talking about it. But I think it’s useful here, because you’re going to give a different opinion than 99% the other guests that come on the podcast. How does cold calling fit into all of this? Looking forward like 2, 3, 4, 5 years, is this the skill that we should? Because clearly we want these high paying roles where we’ve got essentially leverage in the position that we can walk away and take a load of business with us because they can’t generate it without us personally. Is cold calling a skill that we should be really doubling down on right now in 2017 or are there other things that we should be thinking about as well?

 

Jarrod Glandt:

I think kind of what you’re alluding to is, Hey, is sales changing to the point where the cold call is becoming less valuable because of demand generation and inbound leads and content marketing and all that stuff? And that’s fun, but you become an effect of something else rather than the cause of it. So dude, can we put content out every day that drives somebody to a lead page to download an ebook, a warm lead, and call somebody up and see if there’s an opportunity there? Totally. But when I have a salesperson that can walk in and go, “I want to take down Sprint Wireless or Ashley Furniture or whoever,” And they can go out and they can pick up the phone and make that happen. I got Steve Spray right now.

 

Jarrod Glandt:

He’s like, “I’m going to take down Ashley Furniture,” Which is in the states. I’m sure they have them there too. They’re a massive furniture company, largest furniture company in the country. And dude, he picked up the phone and he’s picking them off. He’s picking all the people off as he goes, because he is like, “I’m a sniper. I can go in early. I can take out the key targets and I can allow the team to advance.” So the cold, is it the skill you should be doubling down on? Of course, 100%. Because those are the most skilled people. Those will be the Navy seals of your sales team. And then when you, as a company, want to say, hey, we need to penetrate this industry. There’s two cycles that we talk about.

 

Jarrod Glandt:

We talk about the business cycle and then we talk about the sales cycle. There’s two separate cycles. So we operate as sales people in the sales cycle. The company operates in the business cycle. Their job is to spend money to market and promote and grab attention and create traffic that leads into the sales process. Sales people get hung up in this sales process. If you work for a big company, you are a function of the business cycle. You are waiting for the billion dollar company who went out and did a $200 million raise from a venture capital company that has money to spend.

 

Jarrod Glandt:

You are an effect of that system, that ecosystem. For most entrepreneurs, small business owners, people that are operating in a company right now that they feel doesn’t provide them with adequate opportunities, they operate in this business or in this sales cycle, right? Like they are transactional. They don’t have the ability to go out and spend the money. So, as a salesperson, if you want to create more opportunity rather than being the effect of an opportunity given to you, you must learn to cold call because it’s the only way that you can do it.

 

Will Barron:

We’ll have you back on the future there because clearly there’s programmes which you can promote on this as well in the back of an interview. And we’ll dive into cold calling in more detail, perhaps we can get a couple of people with different opinions on this as well. Because clearly it’s a hot topic, probably 50%, because people don’t like doing it. So they’re trying to avoid doing it essentially. That’s why people are talking about personal branding and, and content marketing and things like this.

 

Objection Handling Techniques and Processes During a Cold Call · [17:41] 

 

Will Barron:

But then the other 50% of, if it works, then who are you to kind of compete with the market or tell them how things should be done? So, I’m up for a discussion on that. But bringing it back to objections for a second, we get them on the phone and perhaps cold calling skills comes into, this is to use your language here, is the goal to snipe down these objections and just break through them? And they’re almost insignificant. They don’t matter to us. The goal is to get the conversation progressed or are we strategic? Are we tactical? Are we listening to the conversations and the objections and absorbing them and pondering on them and giving them back to them? Are we going snipe or are we going kind of lovey dovey with this?

 

Jarrod Glandt:

No. And just to clarify one thing, I think that handling objections is 90% of cold calling. So, those conversations come together really, really quick. But on a cold call, you are going in as a targeted assassin, you’re walking into a narrow alleyway with corners and curves and potential bogies or enemy fighters around every corner. And the only way that you win is to be prepared. So like, the only way that that skill gets developed is through role play, training, education, repetition. And so like in a cold call, for example, I mean really when you talk about objections period, it’s like there’s real objections, true obstacles to getting the deal done. There’s fake objections, which are fabrications made up reaction responses. And then there’s the deep rooted unspoken objection that most salespeople never get down to.

 

Jarrod Glandt:

And so on a cold call, the objection handling process is typically dealing with a fake objection, a reactionary defence response. I’m not interested. We’re just looking, we’re good. Don’t have the time for this. It’s a preset automaticity that people have in their communication path when they get something unexpected put in front of them. The amateur sales person gives up, right? Because, they’re not prepared. Because if I got a group of 100 people and I said, “Who likes making cold calls and handling objections?” Five of them raise their hand, right? Maybe three. I don’t know. But if I said, “If I could show you a way where you could handle any objection with any customer, any industry, any position, any title, any day, any time, I could show you a way that I could guarantee I could do that, would you like making cold calls? Would you like going into closing situations? How excited would you be to get some objections if you knew you could handle them?” Everybody’d raise their hand.

 

Jarrod Glandt:

So it comes down to people understanding how to do it the right way. And so again, opening cold call, you’re typically it’s a quick, fast paced handling of a reactionary response. Later on in the deal you’re basically probably going to be presented with one or two false fake made up objections before you can really get down to what the real problem is.

 

Will Barron:

So it’s almost like, and you may or may not kind of get relate or have come across this before. We had a pickup artist on the show recently, and he was talking about women. And obviously this goes beyond men and women. It’s like masculine and feminine, but feminine or women giving masculine or men shit tests. And they want you to succeed. They want you to get past that test, but they give you essentially a fake objection, a reason why they don’t want to speak to you at the bar, a reason why they don’t want to do whatever you’re suggesting, because they want to see that you’re a leader.

 

Dissecting Sales Objections: Differentiating Between Real and Made Up Objections · [21:30]

 

Will Barron:

They want to see that you’ve got past this, that you can handle it. And that there’s someone that they should trust and follow. How much of it is kind of inept and a thought about like that from the person who is, that’s on the end of the phone? And how much of it is literally, they don’t have time, they’re not interested, they don’t want to do it? How much of it is strategic from them? And how much of it is just words that are coming out of their mouth that they’re not even processing if that makes sense?

 

“There’s not one person on the planet who cannot make the time for something if it’s important enough.” – Jarrod Glandt · [22:39] 

 

Jarrod Glandt:

I mean, I don’t know what the scientific breakdown of it is. And I don’t know if there was a way to find that. If you called me and tried to sell me something right now at the office, I’d say, “Hey man, not interested. Don’t have the time.” And I’d hang up. Okay. Now, if you called the office and said, “Hey, I’ve got a way to sell 1000 tickets to your 10X growth con in 2018,” I’d be like, “Man, I got all the time in the day for you.” Right? Because that’s something I have my attention on right now is, hey, how do I sell 8,000 tickets to this event? So there’s not one person on the planet who cannot make the time for something if it’s important enough, if it’s something they have attention on, if it’s something that they have this gushing wound and they need a bandaid for it ASAP.

 

“On an opening cold call, a large percentage of what you hear are not true objections.” – Jarrod Glandt · [23:28] 

 

Jarrod Glandt:

There’s not one person who wouldn’t make the time for that. I work with Grant Cardone, right? Worth a couple hundred million bucks. He’s chasing four or five $90 million real estate deals right now, flying different cities. I get him for 15 seconds on a phone call. “Hey, how’s the thing going?” Good. Yeah. Okay. Bye. Right? The second I start talking about something that actually has interest on him. Hey, how are we going to sell more of these tickets? Hey, I got an idea about this, he got all the time in the world. So again, on an opening cold call, large percentage of what you hear are not true real objections. And later on in the process, as you start really working into the deal, hopefully, if you’ve done your job asking questions and presenting the product, then in doing all the right things up front, then you’re going to know a lot of the objections that they’re going to have to moving forward.

 

Will Barron:

Love it. Okay. So when you were describing the analogy of sniper and corners and shooting, as you were describing cold call, your face lit open, and you had a big smile on there, so clearly you would be one of the three that would raise their hand in the 100 that loves cold calling. Clearly, there’s opportunity to make a shit load of money from it. And clearly, I can only assume that you’re doing really well from that. And so that adds to it over time, of course.

 

Why Salespeople Need to Start Embracing Cold Calling · [24:15] 

 

Will Barron:

But for someone listening to this show now who has been avoiding cold calling or someone who sucks at it, they now have the context of objections, whether they’re real, whether they’re fake that someone, at least one person, out of the billions of people out there from this conversation, they know at least one person likes it so that proves that you can like it too. How do they get it in their head that this is a positive thing that they should be looking forward to as opposed to something that they’re nervous about? Because clearly if you’re nervous, when you go into it, you’re not going to have the best results.

 

Jarrod Glandt:

I’ll just tell you right now, I hate making cold calls. Like if you ask me, do you love making cold calls? Like who in this group loves making cold calls? I would not raise my hand. I don’t love being a salesperson. Like I’m not in love with being a salesperson. Okay. But I want to make money. Like my desire to make money and succeed and win in life is greater than my dislike for making a cold call or being a salesperson. So I want to be successful. I didn’t go to law school. I didn’t go to medical school. I’m not tall enough to be an athlete. I’m not good enough at golf to be a professional and get paid for it. It’s just not real for me. But I’m not willing to give up on my first goal, which is dude, I want to freaking win in life.

 

“How do you get sold on cold calling when you freaking hate it? Well, you get a goal so big that you’ll do anything to get it.” – Jarrod Glandt · [25:45] 

 

Jarrod Glandt:

I want to be financially free by the time I’m 40 and do whatever the hell I want to do. So I’m willing to do all the things that I don’t want to do in order to get there. And 95% of people are not willing to make that decision. So, like, how do you get sold on cold calling when you freaking hate it? You get a goal so big that you’ll do anything to get it. You got to clarify what’s important to you and you got to burn that into your head. So that the only thing that you’re thinking about when you show up and you pick up that phone is, every time, I pick up this phone and make this call, I’m getting one step closer to that thing that I want. I’m getting one step closer to the life that I want to live. I’m getting one step closer to a million dollars a month in passive income for the rest of my life.

 

Jarrod Glandt:

Like you have to view, you have to change the game. So I don’t think you have to love it. And I don’t think you have to love being a salesperson. And I think that people flip that conversation. They think they need to love being a salesperson. You don’t. You need to be great at it. You need to be great at it so that you can win and you can make money and you can be successful. Like that’s why I’m a salesperson. It ain’t because I love it.

 

Will Barron:

Sure. We’ve covered this on the show. I’m glad you said this because we’ve got the same thoughts on this. We’ve covered it on the show before. I think sales, because it’s difficult, because it can be stressful, because it can be a burden on your time and resources and other things, I think sales should be a 5, 10, 15 year stint as opposed to a career. And it’s why I have problems sometimes when people talk about selling as a profession that you start at university and you do it for the foreseeable future. If people start going to a true academic university for four or five years to do this, I think it’s just going to become commoditized. And then there’ll still be, to use your language, that the killers will be crushing it and earning 10 times more than anyone else from that perspective. And I think that’s where we should all be aiming for. And I think we should be working to achieve that financial freedom.

 

The Moment Jarrod Realized He Didn’t Want to Be in Sales All His Life · [27:43] 

 

Will Barron:

And so with all that said, give us a bit because I’ve talked about why I’ve started the podcast, why I left my sales role to achieve financial freedom in a condensed amount of time versus the traditional way going about it. But Jarrod, tell us now you’ve said this, I’m assuming it was a light bulb moment of you don’t want to just have a job for the rest of your life. You want to condense down this time that you’re going to spend working and then maybe you work after the [inaudible 00:27:53]. But you don’t have to, you’ve got control things. When was that light bulb moment and how did it come about?

 

Jarrod Glandt:

For people who haven’t heard my story before, 21 years old, I was selling advertising for a billion dollar company. I was living at home with my parents still. I was making 180,000 a year. I had zero debt, no expenses, no bills. And I literally, over the course of two years, blew every dollar I made going out, drinking, partying, started smoking weed, doing drugs. And then three years later I turn around, I’m on unemployment. I’m smoking weed every day and I’m overweight. And I’m just like, dude, what happened to my life? Like everybody was telling me, you’re going to do so many amazing things. Everything’s going to be great for you. You’re going to be so successful. And then I look back and I’m at a point where I’m like, I’m like lower than low right now. And so I ended up moving away from my friends with my dad to go work for him in a different state move from California to Texas.

 

Jarrod Glandt:

And I kind of was starting to get everything put back together there like just focusing on being productive. I had a job again just working through that. And so like I had to go from this low point and kind of start working my way back up to just even like a basic normal stage. And then once I got to that, I was reminded of, Hey, you have potential. People, they see something in you. And then I actually moved back to San Diego away from my parents. And my dad sent me a video on YouTube of a guy named Grant Cardone. And I watched one video of it and then a second and then a third and then four hours later, I’d gone through every video that he had on his YouTube channel.

 

Jarrod Glandt:

And I was like, “Dude, I got to go work for this guy.” Like, because what he did is, he showed me. He’s like, dude, this is real for you. Like you have the opportunity to do this. It’s not past you. You didn’t miss your opportunity. You didn’t miss your window. Like you have control over this. All you have to do is make the decision. And so I made the decision, I moved up to LA. I worked with him. We lived on, slept on an air mattress for a year. I was broke, figuring out this sales thing, this cold calling thing. And I worked for him, almost quit, worked for him for maybe a year and a half, almost two years. And I started making money. Seeing him with all his money, I’m like, man, there’s something happening here. And about a year and a half or two years later, I had 100,000 in the bank.

 

Jarrod Glandt:

So I had 100,000 cash in the bank. And I looked at myself and I was like, okay, this is a moment here. Like you’ve reached a pretty significant amount of money compared to most people at your age in the bank. What are you going to do with it? And I was like, I got to go big. I got to go all in and I have to start multiplying my money. So the money that I made, wasn’t mine. The money that I will continue to make isn’t mine, it’s all an investment in the future. So I just started banking everything. So, that was like probably 27 years old that whole deal went down. And four years later, I was a millionaire.

 

Role Playing and Why Jarrod Believes It’s the Most Important Training Tool a Salesperson Can Have · [31:10] 

 

Will Barron:

Should the audience go with everything that we just thrown at them because we’ve covered a lot of ground here? If they were to take one thing from this episode, if you could drill one thing into their head and clearly people are driving the gene and you’ve just motivated them in this moment of motivation, what’s the one thing from whether they should be role playing, whether they should be using Cardone University, whether they should be embracing cold calling rather than running away from it so we’re probably not kind of uncovered myself through this, kind of three or four points there. What’s the one thing that they should take away from this conversation, Jarrod?

 

Jarrod Glandt:

Look, if people are coming here because they want to improve their ability to handle objections, it’s only going to have been through role playing. Right? Agree, acknowledge, redirect. Like it’s a very simple process of actually handling an objection, but most people decide to have confrontation rather than agreement. So they can’t even get into the objection handling sequence. Right? And none of that matters if you don’t role play. So, I completely understand you’re not interested. 90% of the people I talk to aren’t interested either. Down the street I just spoke with and we did a deal with them two months ago, their business is up 45%. I just wanted an opportunity to share the same product with you from them or whatever your specific situation is. People tell us they’re not interested and they don’t have time all the time.

 

Should Salespeople be Documenting the Objections They Encounter on a Daily Basis? · [32:31] 

 

Will Barron:

Is that something we should be doing? I think you’ve touched on something really important here. Should we be documenting the objections that we get so that we can suss out what ones we can knock out and role play on? Because that’s something that I never did when I was in the medical device sales role. And it’s something that in hindsight, there’s probably only three objections that I ever got. And sitting down with someone smarter than myself or a salesperson, who’s really crushing it in the team and asking their opinions, that probably would’ve solved those three objections for me. Is that something that we should be doing? Should we be documenting this?

 

Jarrod Glandt:

100%, you got to know. Like if I walked back into my sales office right now and I said, “Hey, what are the top three sale objections that you hear on a call?” They’re going to be like, “Not interested. Don’t have the time. It’s too much money.” And that’s what we drill in role play. Occasionally, there’s another third or fourth or fifth one that comes in. And so we’ll drop that into the sequence. But most of the time it’s handling those three issues. Not interested. Don’t have the time. It’s too much money.

 

Are Salespeople Scared of the Confrontations That Arise From Sales Objections? · [33:30] 

 

Will Barron:

Well, it’s funny, because when you say it like that, it’s making me laugh and smile as I say this, it’s so simple, right? It’s a simple problem that obviously takes skill to solve. But are we blowing all this out proportion when people are scared of cold calling when people are scared of. Maybe it’s not even the objection they’re scared of. Are people scared of the confrontation? Is that the problem?

 

Jarrod Glandt:

It could be. It could be that they’re scared to stick in there, but they’re only scared because they don’t know. You only fear things that are unknown to you. And so the more knowledge you build and gain, the higher your comfort level will go. Do you watch baseball at all?

 

Will Barron:

No. I’ve got family in Chicago. I watched one game. I had no idea what the hell was going on for hours on end. I was just scared of the ball hitting me in the face the whole time. But you will use a baseball analogy because some of the audience will probably understand it.

 

Jarrod Glandt:

So like at the end of the game, they have a pitcher who’s like the closer, right? He comes in, he usually pitches the last inning of the game or last inning and a half of the game. And he comes in with a fresh arm. He throws a really high mile per hour fastball, 97, 98, 99 mile an hour fastball. And most of the time these guys just get in there and they throw the ball really, really hard. Right? Most batters know when they go up against the closer that he is throwing a fast ball. They know what pitch is coming and they still miss. So a professional who knows what pitch is coming still misses the sometimes. So an amateur who doesn’t know what pitch is coming and who hasn’t trained on hitting that pitch, what chance do they have to hit in the ball? Almost none.

 

Jarrod Glandt:

So like you have to understand that you don’t make contact every time. If I picked up a phone and made 100 cold calls today, I would lose on calls. It’s just part of the deal. Like even the best prepared, even the most professional, even the one who can predict the objection, who knows the call, is still going to get hung up on. Right? And that all goes back to like, how do you take that experience? Is it a loss for you? Because if it’s a loss for you, then you’re going to have all those emotions associated with it.

 

“You have to understand that you don’t make contact every time. But if you can view every opportunity as something that moves you closer rather than further away and is a win instead of a loss, then a lot of the lack of confidence and the fear and the uncomfortability and the lack of confidence, whatever you want to call it, that is associated with handling objections, cold calling, closing, then a lot of that stuff goes away.” · [36:00] 

 

Jarrod Glandt:

If you can handle an objection the right way or you can view that the situation you were in, the objection that you received, as an opportunity to move closer towards your goals and closer towards that early retirement, closer towards that new car or that raise or that house or those shoes or whatever the suit, whatever’s important to you, if you can view every opportunity as something that moves you closer rather than further away and is a win instead of a loss, then a lot of the lack of confidence in the fear and the uncomfortability and the lack of confidence, whatever you want to call it, that is associated with handling objections, cold calling, closing, whatever, then a lot of that stuff goes away.

 

Jarrod’s Advise to His Younger Self on How to Become Better at Selling · [36:40]

 

Will Barron:

Amazing stuff. Makes perfect sense. And Jarrod, I’ve got one fan question maybe we’ll wrap up with this, that I ask everyone that comes on the show. And that is, if you could go back in time and speak to your younger self, I don’t know whether it’d be your 21 year old self or beyond that, what would be the one piece of advice you’d give him to help him become better at selling?

 

Jarrod Glandt:

I would’ve learned how to cold call back then. I mean the cold call is the liberating thing. It’s the one thing that can give you the pathway to do whatever you want. So I go back to 21, actually the example I used, the advertising example, that was me. I had a set territory. I went in, I built relationships with people and they bought more based on how much they liked me. It had nothing to do with me going in and getting cold opportunities and new business and creating something.

 

Jarrod Glandt:

It was because I was personable and they liked me and I took them to baseball games. So I would go back and I would say, look, master the cold call. If you hate the cold call, it’s even more important that you do it. Because you said, hey, sales should be a 4, 10, 15 year stint and then you should go on and do something else. If you want to go start your own business, you’re going to become a salesperson again. And you’re going to need to pick up a phone call and you want to be prepared for that call.

 

Parting Thoughts · [36:50]

 

Will Barron:

Love it. Well, with that, Jarrod, tell us where we can find out more about you kind of personally and then Cardone University and everything else that goes along with that as well.

 

Jarrod Glandt:

Yeah, so you can follow me on Twitter, Instagram for Facebook. It’s @Jarrodglandt, J-A-R-R-O-D-G-L-A-N-D-T. You can sign up for our programmes. You can get free access to our university, freetrialaccess@cardoneuniversity.com. Just hit get free access and you’ll get a log into the programme. And you can see what some of the content’s about. We have a huge coming up in February of 2018 called the 10X Growth Conference. Three day event. Day one is going to be all CEOs, business owners, guys that are all doing over $100 million a year in sales that started from nothing.

 

Jarrod Glandt:

They’re going to teach you how to scale and grow and lead and have vision for the position that you’re in. Day two is all about marketing branding, lead generation, expanding your footprint in the marketplace and creating sales opportunities. And day three is about how to create a successful environment, how to be healthy fit, how to get the right mindset in yourself and your team. So it’s a really comprehensive three day event. People can get more information about that at 10xgrowthcon.com. We’re going to have the most badass lineup of speakers that you see at any event this year. I guarantee it.

 

Will Barron:

Well, I will link to all of that in the show note of this episode over at salesmanpodcast.com. And with that, Jarrod, we covered a lot of ground here, mate. So I appreciate that. And thank you for joining us on the Salesman podcast.

 

Jarrod Glandt:

All right. Take care.

 

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